2005

- CAD grants Certificate of Airworthiness to special freighter , (19 December 2005)
- Hong Kong inks aviation maintenance MOU with Canada , (5 December 2005)
- Aviation Security (Amendment) Ordinance to come into operation , (10 November 2005)
- Flight movements to break record on October 14 , (30 September 2005)
- Report on aircraft incident , (16 September 2005)
- CAD annual search and rescue exercise a success , (22 August 2005)
- Aircraft Occurrence Report , (28 July 2005)
- Government publishes B-HYA aircraft accident report , (15 July 2005)
- Preliminary Report on Robinson R44 Helicopter Accident Released , (11 July 2005)
- CAD to host ICAO Asia Pacific Regional Seminar on Facilitation , (20 June 2005)
- CAD conducting an investigation into a private helicopter accident , (12 June 2005)
- Helicopter Crash Roundup , (11 June 2005)
- Helicopter landing incident , (31 May 2005)
- New measure for APDT refund introduced , (25 April 2005)
- Lighters banned on US bound flights and US airlines , (9 April 2005)
- Flight movements to break record at Easter , (17 March 2005)
- Government publishes Aircraft Accident Report 1/2004 and report of the Board of Review , (4 February 2005)
- Flight movements to break record in Lunar New Year , (3 February 2005)
- Helicopter incident - loss of radio communication , (26 January 2005)
- Cathay Pacific Airways gets approval to levy fuel surcharges , (20 January 2005)
- Light plane in landing incident , (18 January 2005)


CAD grants Certificate of Airworthiness to special freighter


19 December 2005


The Civil Aviation Department (CAD) today (December 19) issued a Certificate of Airworthiness to a Boeing 747-400 special freighter, which is the first Cathay Pacific Airways' B747-400 freighter converted from a passenger aircraft.


At a ceremony held in the Taikoo (Xiamen) Aircraft Engineering Company Limited (TAECO) in Xiamen today, Director-General of Civil Aviation Mr Norman Lo said that there were a number of "firsts" achieved in this event: the first conversion of a Boeing 747-400 passenger aircraft into a freighter; the first time that such a conversion was carried out outside the Boeing facility; and the first time that the certification flight tests were conducted outside the United States.


Mr Lo highlighted that the modification of the passenger aircraft to freighter was performed by TAECO in Xiamen. As a regulatory authority, CAD had been monitoring the progress with a view to ensuring that high standards of workmanship, airworthiness and safety were achieved. During the conduct of the intensive certification flight tests in Hong Kong airspace, the Hong Kong Air Traffic Control Centre worked closely with the Boeing flight test team to ensure the smooth completion of the rigorous flight tests within the busy Hong Kong airspace.


On the same occasion, TAECO also received an approval for its new hangar íV the fourth hangar of TAECO, which is capable of accommodating two aircraft, including an Airbus A380. Prior to the issue of the approval, a joint audit of the new facility was conducted to the satisfaction of CAD, the General Administration of Civil Aviation of China, Singapore Civil Aviation Authority, United States Federal Aviation Administration, Japan Civil Aviation Bureau and United Kingdom Civil Aviation Authority. As this new hangar meets the regulatory requirements of the participating aviation authorities, it will come into service this month (December 2005).

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Hong Kong inks aviation maintenance MOU with Canada


5 December 2005


The Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department (CAD) and the Civil Aviation Directorate of Transport Canada (TCCA) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) known as the "Technical Arrangement on Aviation Maintenance", on mutual recognition of approvals of maintenance organisations in Hong Kong and Canada today (December 5) in Hong Kong.


Before they are allowed to maintain components of aircraft registered in a country, maintenance organisations are required to obtain approval from the aviation authority of that country and be subjected to the authority's regulations, audits and standards. The MOU allows the civil aviation authorities of Hong Kong and Canada to recognise each other's approvals of maintenance organisations to maintain aircraft components. This means that Hong Kong-based maintenance organisations can maintain aircraft components for Canada-registered aircraft without seeking additional approval from the Civil Aviation Directorate of Transport Canada (TCCA). Likewise, maintenance organisations based in Canada can maintain aircraft components for Hong Kong-registered aircraft.


The Acting Assistant Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Tsang Yuk-poon, said, "Partnership between civil aviation authorities through mutual recognition will reduce duplication of approval and audit work by the authorities thus maximising the utilisation of resources of both the regulators and the industry. In the end, such mutual recognition will improve the quality of aircraft maintenance through the use of common airworthiness standards."


Hong Kong made similar mutual recognition arrangements on aircraft maintenance with the Mainland and Macau and with Singapore in 2002 and 2004 respectively. The extension of the mutual recognition arrangement to other countries is well supported by the aviation industry.

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Aviation Security (Amendment) Ordinance to come into operation


10 November 2005


The Aviation Security (Amendment) Ordinance 2005 (the Amendment Ordinance) will come into operation today (November 10) according to a commencement notice tabled at the Legislative Council on October 12, 2005.


The Amendment Ordinance imposes criminal sanctions against unruly or disruptive behaviour offences committed on board civil aircraft, and extends Hong Kong's jurisdiction over unruly or disruptive behaviour offences committed outside Hong Kong on board non-Hong Kong-controlled civil aircraft which next land in Hong Kong.


"The Amendment Ordinance introduces seven new offences relating to unruly or disruptive behaviour committed on board civil aircraft, including offences relating to obstruction of crew members in performing their duties; failure to comply with instructions given by crew members; disorderly behaviour; tampering or interfering with aircraft component, apparatus, equipment or systems; intoxication by alcohol, drug or other intoxicating substances; smoking and the operation of electronic devices in the aircraft when it is prohibited," a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department said.


In addition, Hong Kong's jurisdiction has been extended to 11 existing criminal acts and offences falling under the general description of assault, intimidation, sexual assault and child molestation committed on board a non-Hong Kong-controlled aircraft while in flight outside Hong Kong, with its next place of landing in Hong Kong.


The maximum penalty for the new unruly behaviour offences will range from a fine of $25,000 and 1-year imprisonment under summary conviction to a fine of $100,000 and 5-year imprisonment under conviction on indictment.


The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) has passed a resolution urging Contracting States to enact law and regulations to deal effectively with the problem of unruly passenger offences.


"As an international aviation center, Hong Kong has observed closely the safety and security standards and practices promulgated by ICAO under the relevant international conventions. The Amendment Ordinance is indicative of our commitment to the international efforts to deal more effectively with the growing problem of unruly passengers," the spokesman said.

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Flight movements to break record on October 14


22 August 2005


A record high number of flight movements at Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) is expected to be achieved on October 14 (Friday), when 835 aircraft are scheduled to arrive and depart.


"The number of flight movements expected on October 14 represents an increase of about 8% compared with an average of 770 movements a day," a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department said today (September 30).


In October, the National Day holiday (October 1), the Chung Yeung Festival holiday (October 11) and the Guangzhou Trade Fair to be held from October 15 fall over a two-week period, boosting the demand in air travel.


To date, eight airlines have submitted slot requests to operate 75 additional scheduled and ad-hoc charter flights (a total of 150 flight movements) from October 1 to 14. All requests received have been accepted.


Airlines that have already submitted the requests plan to operate flights to seven destinations in Northeast Asia, five destinations on the Mainland, two in Southeast Asia, two in Australia and two in the Middle East. Taipei is the most popular destination, followed by Guangzhou, Kaohsiung and Guilin.


The previous record high of 786 flight movements in a single day occurred on March 25, during the Easter holidays.

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Report on aircraft incident


16 September 2005


The Civil Aviation Department (CAD) has been notified of an aircraft incident at 1.28pm today (September 16) at the Macao International Airport involving a Hong Kong-registered CRJ700 aircraft of CR Airways which was conducting aircrew base training at Macao with four flight crew members on board and no passengers.


While the aircraft was holding near Runway 34, its tailplane was slightly damaged by the left wing of a taxiing Boeing 747 aircraft. No one was injured.


According to international practice, the incident is being investigated by the Civil Aviation Authority of Macao and the CAD will provide necessary assistance.

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CAD annual search and rescue exercise a success


22 August 2005


The Civil Aviation Department successfully conducted a search and rescue exercise (SAREX) today (August 22) at Tung O Wan on Lamma Island.


Seven search and rescue (SAR) units participated in the exercise, which included the Civil Aviation Department, the Hong Kong Garrison of the People's Liberation Army Forces (PLA), Government Flying Service (GFS), Marine Department, Marine Police, Fire Services Department (FSD) and Civil Aid Service.


"The exercise is held annually to strengthen co-operation and co-ordination in search and rescue operations between the department and PLA, and other SAR units of the Hong Kong Government," a spokesman for the department said.


"It provides air traffic controllers, aircrew and other SAR units likely to be involved in such operations with continued training and familiarisation with search and rescue techniques."


Today's exercise scenario was a helicopter crash at Tung O Wan on Lamma Island. A fixed-wing aircraft and an Eurocopter Super Puma helicopter from GFS and a Marine Police launch were deployed to the scene soon after a report of the helicopter crash was received. At the same time, PLA deployed two naval ships and a Z9 helicopter to join the search and rescue operation. The forces and GFS conducted an aerial search and demonstrated the water winching of two survivors. The FSD sent a fireboat to fight the blaze and divers were also deployed for the rescue.


The exercise was successfully completed in about one hour. More than 50 staff members from the participating units were mobilised.


"Under Annex 12 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, a contracting state is obliged to provide search and rescue services within its designated search and rescue region. The Civil Aviation Department organises an annual search and rescue exercise to enhance the department's search and rescue capabilities," the spokesman said.

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Aircraft Occurrence Report


28 July 2005


In response to press reports today (July 28) regarding a flap track fairing falling from an A330 of KA 363 flying from Tokyo to Hong Kong on July 22, 2005, a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department (CAD) clarified that the flap track fairing did not fall off in flight as reported. He emphasised that flight safety was in no way compromised.


"After the accident, the Chief Inspector of Accidents ordered an Inspector's Investigation into the accident in accordance with the Hong Kong Civil Aviation (Investigation of Accidents) Regulations (Cap. 448 sub. leg. B). The objective of the investigation was to determine the circumstances and the causes of the accident with a view to the preservation of life and the avoidance of accidents in the future. It is not for apportioning blame or liability," a Government spokesman said.


"The function of the fairing is to reduce aerodynamic drag to enhance fuel efficiency. Its absence does not have any flight safety implication." He said that under the maintenance and operation guidelines of the aircraft manufacturer, the aircraft could continue flying with the flap track fairing removed pending replacement.


CAD will closely liaise with Dragonair to expedite the replacement of the fairing.

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Government publishes B-HYA aircraft accident report


15 July 2005


The Government today (July 15) publishes the report of the investigation into an aircraft accident on July 18, 2003. The accident involved an Airbus A330 aircraft operated by Hong Kong Dragon Airlines. Two members of the cabin crew suffered serious injuries while 10 other crew members and three passengers sustained minor injuries.


"After the accident, the Chief Inspector of Accidents ordered an Inspector's Investigation into the accident in accordance with the Hong Kong Civil Aviation (Investigation of Accidents) Regulations (Cap. 448 sub. leg. B). The objective of the investigation was to determine the circumstances and the causes of the accident with a view to the preservation of life and the avoidance of accidents in the future. It is not for apportioning blame or liability," a Government spokesman said.


The investigation was conducted by a team of trained accident investigators in strict adherence to the international standards established by the International Civil Aviation Organisation. The investigation report contains an analysis of the circumstances of the accident, identifies possible causes of the accident, and makes safety recommendations. Throughout the accident investigation, all concerned parties have been given ample opportunities to comment on the findings of the report.


Copies of the report are now available for sale at the Publications Sales Unit of the Information Services Department in Room 402, Murray Building, Garden Road, Central. It is also available for downloading from the web-site of the Civil Aviation Department (http://www.cad.gov.hk).

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Preliminary Report on Robinson R44 Helicopter Accident Released


11 July 2005


In accordance with the Hong Kong Civil Aviation (Investigation of Accidents) Regulations, an Inspector's investigation is in progress to determine the circumstances and causes relating to the accident involving the Robinson R44 helicopter of Topjet Aviation Limited at Pak A, High Island, Sai Kung, Hong Kong on June 11, 2005.


A Civil Aviation Department spokesman today (July 11) said the preliminary report contained facts relating to the accident as determined up to the time of issue and must be regarded as tentative.


"The investigation team will continue to collect various relevant information in order to determine the circumstances and causes that relate to the accident. More in-depth investigation and analysis work remain to be done before a conclusion can be drawn on what caused the accident. The final report is expected to be completed within one year," the spokesman said.


"This preliminary report is published at this stage for general information."


The following is the content of the full preliminary report:-


Chief Inspector of Accidents
Accident Investigation Division
Civil Aviation Department
46/F Queensway Government Offices
66 Queensway
Hong Kong
July 11, 2005


Accident Bulletin 1/05

Aircraft Type:   Robinson R44
Registration:   B-HJS
Year of Manufacture:   2000
Number and Type of Engines:   1 Textron-Lycoming O-540-F1B5 piston engine
Date and Time of Accident:   June 11, 2005, at 06:10 hour UTC (2.10pm local time)
Place of Accident:   Pak A, High Island, Sai Kung, Hong Kong
Nature of Accident:   The helicopter took off at 06:10 hour UTC at Pak A. While the helicopter was in a hover, it yawed continuously to the right, banking to the left until it impacted with the ground. The helicopter was destroyed.
Type of Flight:   Private
Persons on Board:   Crew: 1   Passengers: 3
Injuries:   3
Pilot's Licence:   Hong Kong Private Pilot's Licence (Helicopters)
Pilot's Flying Experience:   180 hours (of which 34 were on type)
Sources of Information:   Site investigation and interviews


Helicopter Accident - June 11, 2005
Robinson R44 Helicopter Registration Mark B-HJS


1. In the afternoon of June 11, 2005, a Robinson R44 helicopter of Topjet Aviation Limited operated by a pilot and with three passengers on board took off at Pak A on the second run of a private Visual Flight Rules (VFR) flight from Pak A to the Hong Kong Aviation Club at the former Kai Tak Airport.


2. The helicopter took off at 06:10 hour UTC (2.10pm hour local time) from a sandy-grassed area at Pak A. While the helicopter was in a hover on a northerly heading, it yawed continuously to the right, banking to the left until it impacted with the ground on a southerly heading at approximately four metres to the east of the take-off position. The helicopter then rested on the ground with the fuselage tilting to the left. The left skid was substantially damaged. The main rotor blades remained intact but were bent and twisted. Both tail rotor blades were severed. The tail boom was substantially broken approximately in the middle. There was no post-impact fire.


3. The take-off weight of the helicopter was 999 kg, approximately 90 kg below the maximum approved gross weight for the Robinson R44 helicopter (1,089 kg). The helicopter was within both longitudinal and lateral center of gravity limits.


4. The pilot held a current Hong Kong Private Pilot's Licence (Helicopters) and a valid Class Two Medical Certificate. He had 180 hours of flying experience in helicopter. His initial Hong Kong Private Pilot's Licence (Helicopters) Licensing Flight Test was carried out on Robinson R22 helicopter on November 6, 2004, in Hong Kong. His conversion training to Robinson R44 helicopter type was conducted in Hong Kong and his Robinson R44 helicopter type rating tests were carried out on December 4, 2004. Before June 11, 2005, the most recent flight by the pilot on a Robinson R44 helicopter was operated in Hong Kong on June 5, 2005.


5. The Chief Inspector of Accidents has ordered an Inspector's investigation into the accident in accordance with the Hong Kong Civil Aviation (Investigation of Accidents) Regulations. The accident investigation team conducted interviews with the pilot, the passengers and the emergency services units, including the police, fire service and Government Flying Service crews, who were first to attend to the scene of the accident.


6. During the course of the investigation, should safety recommendations be considered necessary, they will be promulgated to the parties concerned before the report of the investigation is published.


This Bulletin contains facts relating to the accident as determined up to the time of issue. The information must necessarily be regarded as tentative and subject to alteration or correction if additional evidence becomes available.

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CAD to host ICAO Asia Pacific Regional Seminar on Facilitation


20 June 2005


The Civil Aviation Department (CAD) will host the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Asia Pacific Regional Seminar on Facilitation from tomorrow (June 21) to 24 at Two International Finance Centre.


A key objective of the seminar is to provide a forum for delegates to share their experiences on the implementation of Machine Readable Passports, with a view that all 188 ICAO member states will have begun issuing machine readable passports by 2010, in accordance with ICAO specifications.


The seminar will focus on the practical aspects of universal implementation of Machine Readable Passports, the enhancement of Machine Readable Travel Documents with biometric identifiers and the use of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) technology at airports. More than 150 delegates from 18 states/territories including the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Republic of Korea, will participate in the Seminar. Representatives from ICAO, International Air Transport Association, Airports Council International, Asia Pacific Smart Card Association and the aviation industry will also attend.

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CAD conducting an investigation into a private helicopter accident


12 June 2005


Regarding the helicopter crash yesterday (June 11) at Pat A, High Island (Leung Shuen Wan), in accordance with the Hong Kong Civil Aviation (Investigation of Accidents) Regulations, the Director-General of Civil Aviation in his capacity of the Chief Inspector of Accidents has ordered an Inspector-in-Charge to coordinate the investigation.


The accident investigation team returned to the accident scene this morning to continue the investigation. The helicopter wreckage is being transported to the hangar of the Government Flying Service (GFS) at Chek Lap Kok in the afternoon for further investigation.

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Helicopter Crash Roundup


11 June 2005


At 2.20pm today (June 11), a Top Jet Aviation Robinson R44 helicopter (Registration BHJS), crash landed at High Island (Leung Shuen Wan) at Pak A.


Soon after lifting off from Sai Kung at 2.11pm with four persons on board, Civil Aviation Department Control Tower received information that the helicopter had crashed. Other helicopters in the vicinity were tasked to locate the crash site. A Government Flying Service Jetstream aircraft and a helicopter were dispatched to the scene for rescue operations. All four people were airlifted to Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital at 3.46pm.


The Civil Aviation Department will carry out an investigation into the accident.

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Helicopter landing incident


31 May 2005


A private helicopter made a precautionary landing at Sai Kung yesterday (May 30), a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department (CAD) said. No one was injured and no property was damaged.


At noon yesterday, a privately owned EC120B helicopter experienced a directional control problem while flying over the High Island Reservoir near Sai Kung, and the pilot made a precautionary landing on the grass near the Chong Hing Water Sports Centre.


The pilot was the only person on board and he was unhurt in the incident. Subsequent ground inspection revealed minor damage on the right-hand skid of the helicopter. The CAD has required the operator to submit a detailed report on the occurrence.

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New measure for APDT refund introduced


25 April 2005


A new measure to help transit passengers claim a cash refund of advance payment of the Air Passenger Departure Tax (APDT) will be implemented at the SkyPier tomorrow (April 26).


To assist transit passengers who arrive at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) SkyPier by ferry for direct onward travel by air to claim cash refund of advance APDT payment, a new Refund Counter will be set up at the SkyPier.


The new Refund Counter manned by the Ferry Terminal Operator is situated in the bus-waiting lounge of the SkyPier. It can be easily accessed by transit passengers who wish to claim the APDT refund at the SkyPier when transiting there.


"Under the existing APDT Ordinance, sea-to-air transit passengers are exempt from APDT," a Government spokesman said.


"The new refund service at the SkyPier will assist and encourage passengers from the Mainland and Macau to make use of the airport. It will further enhance Hong Kong's development as a regional and international aviation hub."

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Lighters banned on US bound flights and US airlines


9 April 2005


With effect from Thursday (April 14), as an enhanced measure to improve aviation security in the United States, lighters will be added by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) (as the appropriate authority for aviation security in the US) to the list of prohibited items on flights to, from or within the US. All US-bound flights and US airlines will need to comply with the TSA requirement.


As far as Hong Kong is concerned, we are currently adopting the list of prohibited items published by the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) and each passenger is allowed to carry one lighter on his or her person. Hong Kong has no intention of deviating from the ICAO list of prohibited items.


The Civil Aviation Department will monitor and ensure that necessary arrangements will be made by parties concerned at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) to comply with the new TSA requirement for US-bound flights and US airlines. While the Airport Authority Hong Kong and airlines concerned will publish advisories on their own websites, passengers affected will also be reminded of the ban when making reservations, checking in, entering the Departure Immigration Hall and at boarding gates at HKIA.

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Flight movements to break record at Easter


17 March 2005


The Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) is expected to handle a record high number of 790 flight movements in a single day on March 25, Good Friday.


"The number of flight movements expected on March 25 represents an increase of more than 8% compared with an average of 730 movements a day," a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department (CAD) said today (March 17).


During the period from March 23 to April 5, 107 additional scheduled and ad-hoc charter flights (a total of 214 flight movements) will be operated by 15 airlines to 10 destinations in the Mainland, 10 destinations in Northeast Asia and eight destinations in Southeast Asia. Beijing is the most popular destination, followed by Seoul, Shanghai and Osaka.


"To cope with the extra traffic, the runway capacity will be increased from 50 to 52 flight movements per hour starting from March 23. Sufficient manpower will also be deployed in the Air Traffic Control Centre and the Air Traffic Control Tower to ensure smooth air traffic operations," the spokesman said.


The previous record of 746 flight movements in a single day occurred on February 9, 2005, which was Lunar New Year's Day.

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Government publishes Aircraft Accident Report 1/2004 and report of the Board of Review


4 February 2005


A private helicopter reported missing earlier this morning has been found safe on Beaufort Island, a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department (CAD) said today (January 26).


The Government today (February 4) publishes the Aircraft Accident Report 1/2004 of an aircraft accident to a Boeing MD-11 passenger aircraft operated by the China Airlines at the Hong Kong International Airport on August 22, 1999, and the Report of the Board of Review. Three passengers died, 50 passengers and crew members suffered serious injuries and 153 received minor injuries as a result of the accident.


Immediately after the accident, the Inspector of Accident conducted an investigation into the accident in accordance with the Hong Kong Civil Aviation (Investigation of Accidents) Regulations (Cap.448 sub.leg. B) (the Regulations) and in strict adherence to the international standards established by the International Civil Aviation Organisation. The Aircraft Accident Report, which was completed in April, 2002, contains an analysis of the circumstances surrounding the accident and safety recommendations.


The China Airlines and the co-pilot of the aircraft, being interested parties to the accident, applied for a review of the findings and conclusions of the Aircraft Accident Report. In September, 2002, the Chief Executive appointed an independent Board of Review which comprised a Principal Magistrate and two overseas expert assessors. The Report of the Board of Review was completed in December, 2004.


"The purpose of the investigation was to determine the circumstances and causes of the accident with a view to the preservation of life and the avoidance of accidents in the future. It was not for apportioning blame or liability," a government spokesman said.


Copies of the two reports are for sale at the Publications Sales Unit of the Information Services Department in Room 402, Murray Building, Garden Road, Central. They are also available for downloading from the web-site of the Civil Aviation Department (http://www.info.gov.hk/cad).

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Flight movements to break record in Lunar New Year


3 February 2005


A record high flight movements at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) is expected to be achieved on Lunar New Year's Day (February 9), when 762 aircraft are scheduled to arrive and depart.


It is also expected that the second highest record will be made on Sunday, February 13, the fifth day of the Lunar New Year, when 752 aircraft are scheduled to arrive and depart.


"The number of flight movements expected on the Lunar New Year's Day represents an increase of about 13% when compared with an average of 675 movements a day," a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department said today (February 3).


As at today, 15 airlines had submitted slot requests to operate 338 additional scheduled and ad-hoc charter flights (i.e. a total of 676 flight movements) from February 4 to February 20, with most applications falling on the period between February 9 (Lunar New Year's Day) and February 13 (the fifth day of the Lunar New Year). All requests received so far have been accepted.


"The runway capacity during the holiday period will be increased from 50 to 52 flight movements per hour to cope with the extra traffic," the spokesman said.


Airlines that have already submitted requests plan to operate flights to 14 destinations on the Mainland, 14 destinations in Northeast Asia, eight destinations in Southeast Asia, and one destination in New Zealand. Taipei is the most popular destination, followed by Seoul, Sapporo, Kunming and Shanghai.


The previous record high of 746 flight movements in a single day occurred on April 9, 2004, which was an Easter holiday.

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Helicopter incident - loss of radio communication


26 January 2005


A private helicopter reported missing earlier this morning has been found safe on Beaufort Island, a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department (CAD) said today (January 26).


A private Robinson R-22 helicopter with two people on board took off at 10.25am from Kai Tak base to Hong Kong South. The helicopter encountered bad weather and decided to land as soon as possible. It then lost radio contact with the Air Traffic Control Tower shortly after 10.54am.


Acting on the missing report, a search operation conducted by GFS helicopter and Marine Police launch was initiated. At 12.45pm, radio contact with the helicopter was re-established and the pilot reported that the helicopter had landed safely on Beaufort Island. The two people on board were not injured and the helicopter was not damaged.


The incident was stood down at 12.49pm.

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Cathay Pacific Airways gets approval to levy fuel surcharges


20 January 2005


The Civil Aviation Department (CAD) today (January 20) approved the filing submitted by Cathay Pacific Airways (CX) to levy a lower passenger fuel surcharge of US$5.3 (HK$42) and US$15 (HK$118) for its short-haul and long-haul services respectively. The revised fuel surcharge will be valid for two months from February 1 to March 31, 2005.


CX does, at present, have approval to collect a fuel surcharge of US$9.2 and US$27 on short- and long-haul services respectively up to January 31, 2005. The revised levels reduce by 40% the existing fuel surcharge.


Current fuel prices remain volatile, fluctuating between US$45 and US$48 per barrel in the past week. Though it has dropped from its peak of around US$56 per barrel in October 2004, the level is still higher than the level of around US$42 per barrel in May 2004 when CX first submitted an application to levy a passenger surcharge of US$5 and US$14 on short- and long-haul services respectively. In view of the current fluctuation in oil prices, the CAD has granted a two-month approval so that the situation can be reviewed within a shorter timeframe.


Forty-three airlines currently have approval to levy a passenger fuel surcharge ranging from US$3.9 to US$29 per coupon on short- and long-haul services respectively up to January 31, 2005. So far, apart from CX, 11 airlines have submitted applications to the CAD to extend the fuel surcharge.

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Light plane in landing incident


18 January 2005


A landing incident occurred at the Shek Kong Airfield about 3.20pm on January 15, 2005, while a student pilot of the Hong Kong Aviation Club (HKAC) was undergoing flying training. No one was injured and no property was damaged.


The aviation club notified the Civil Aviation Department (CAD). An initial inspection revealed some structural damages to the aircraft including the nose landing gear and the propeller. CAD is conducting a field investigation to determine the cause of the incident with a view to preventing recurrence in future.