2004

- Hong Kong inks aviation maintenance MOU with Singapore , (17 December 2004)
- Report on aircraft occurrence , (9 December 2004)
- CAD strives to maintain highest regulatory standards , (9 December 2004)
- Speech by FS at Opening Ceremony of Civil Aviation Directors General Conference , (1 November 2004)
- Speech by DGCA at opening ceremony of 41st DGCAs conference , (1 November 2004)
- HK hosts 41st Conference of Directors General of Civil Aviation , (1 November 2004)
- CAD to issue special stamp to mark opening of conference , (25 October 2004)
- CAD to host major civil aviation conference in November , (25 October 2004)
- Flight standards safety seminar for the Asia-Pacific Region successfully held in Hong Kong, (17 June 2004)
- Approval for airlines to levy fuel surcharges, (31 May 2004)
- PLA displays search-and-rescue capabilities at CAD exercise, (31 May 2004)
- Arrangement Concluded with the Mainland on Aircraft Accident Investigation & Search and Rescue, (7 April 2004)
- International Flight Movements Register 3% Increase in Summer Season, (31 March 2004)
- Announcement of Senior Appointments, (30 March 2004)
- Mount Parker New Route Surveillance Radar Commissioned, (30 March 2004)
- HKCAD Official Chairs International Committee Meeting on Airport Facilitation, (28 March 2004)
- Speech by SEDL at opening ceremony of annual conference of IFATCA, (23 March 2004)
- HK hosts five-day international air traffic controllers conference, (23 March 2004)
- US FAA Administrator Visits Hong Kong, (29 February 2004)
- High-level Meeting to Enhance Air Traffic Management in PRD, (22 February 2004)
- Safe Carriage of Dangerous Goods & Restricted Articles by Air, (17 January 2004)


Hong Kong inks aviation maintenance MOU with Singapore


17 December 2004


The Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department (CAD) and the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) known as "Technical Arrangement on Aviation Maintenance", on mutual recognition of approvals of maintenance organisations in Hong Kong and Singapore yesterday (December 16) in Hong Kong.


Before they are allowed to maintain components of aircraft registered in a country, maintenance organisations are required to obtain approval from the aviation authority of that country and be subjected to the authority's regulations, audits and standards. The MOU allows the civil aviation authorities of Hong Kong and Singapore to recognise each other's approvals of maintenance organisations to maintain aircraft components. This means that Hong Kong-based maintenance organisations can maintain aircraft components for Singapore-registered aircraft without seeking additional approval from the Civil Aviation Authority of Singapore (CAAS). Likewise, maintenance organisations based in Singapore can maintain aircraft components for Hong Kong-registered aircraft.


The Assistant Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr John Lau, said, "Partnership between civil aviation authorities through mutual recognition will reduce duplication of approval and audit work by the authorities thus maximising the utilisation of resources of both the regulators and the industry. In the end, such mutual recognition will improve the quality of aircraft maintenance through the use of common airworthiness standards."


Hong Kong has had similar mutual recognition arrangements on aircraft maintenance with the Mainland and Macau since May 2002 and the extension of the mutual recognition arrangement to other countries in Asia Pacific is well supported by the aviation industry.

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Report on aircraft occurrence


9 December 2004


The Civil Aviation Department (CAD) is fully aware that members of the public attach greatest importance to flight safety. In line with international practice, CAD continues to make immediate public announcement as and when there is aircraft occurrence which may have safety implications and public concern, said the spokesman of CAD.


An occurrence happened on an A330 of CX 564 (Hong Kong/Taipei/Osaka) landed safely in Osaka at 19.01 pm (Osaka time). The commander requested priority landing due to the number two engine exhibited fluctuating parameters and subsequently shut down as a precautionary safety measure. There were 148 passengers on board with no casualty reported.


This occurrence was classified as a Mandatory Reportable Occurrence. CAD reported it to the public because of recent public concern.


Cathy Pacific Airways (CPA) notified CAD immediately after the occurrence. CAD will closely monitor the investigation conducted by CPA.

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CAD strives to maintain highest regulatory standards


9 December 2004


Hong Kong maintained a robust aviation regulatory regime in line with the international standards and the Civil Aviation Department (CAD) attached utmost importance to aviation safety, said Mr Y K Leung, the Deputy Director-General of Civil Aviation Department.


Speaking at a media briefing today (December 9), Mr Leung assured that CAD will immediately notify the public of any occurrences on air safety which may cause public concern.


Hong Kong maintains a reporting system in line with well-established international practice promulgated by the International Civil Aviation Organisation. Under Air Navigation (Hong Kong) Order 1995, Hong Kong Air Operator's Certificate (AOC) holders are required to report to CAD within 96 hours, incidents which fall into the category of Mandatory Occurrence Reporting (MOR).


Mr Leung explained that reportable occurrences under the MOR system include incidents which involve damage to aircraft, injury to person (including crew), failure of multiple aircraft systems or equipments, false fire warning and abnormal functioning of communication system.


The AOC holders hold the responsibility to conduct investigation of the MOR occurrence. CAD keeps tracks of the progress of the investigation of every such occurrence through regular meetings with AOC holders, maintenance organisations and other concerned parties. CAD also monitors AOC holders' actions to correct the fault and prevent recurrence.


"We are fully aware that members of the public attach greatest importance to flight safety. In line with international practice, CAD will continue to make immediate public announcement as and when there are aircraft accident or occurrence which may have safety implications or review systemic problem which may cause public concern," said Mr Leung.


CAD takes every step to ensure a safe, orderly and expeditious flow of air traffic.

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Speech by FS at Opening Ceremony of Civil Aviation Directors General Conference


1 November 2004


Following is the speech (English only) by the Financial Secretary, Mr Henry Tang, at the Opening Ceremony of the 41st Conference of Directors General of Civil Aviation, Asia and Pacific Regions this (November 1) morning:


Dr Cherif, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen,


I am very glad to join you this morning and to welcome you all to Hong Kong for the 41st Conference of the Directors General of Civil Aviation of the Asia and Pacific Regions. May I begin by offering my warmest compliments to the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) and our Civil Aviation Department for their sterling efforts in organizing this important event.


Air transport facilitates trade and investment, promotes tourism, and brings people together. Apart from serving a vital support function, the aviation industry is, in its own rights, an important component of the global economy. Hong Kong is located at the heart of Asia and sits at the gateway of the Mainland of China. Within a five-hour flight, we can reach half of the world's population. Blessed with this unique geographical advantage, our Government and our aviation community have worked in a close partnership for the past decades to make Hong Kong a major aviation hub.


We, in the Government, are committed to strengthening Hong Kong's aviation hub status. We work unceasingly to expand and up-grade our airport facilities to meet the increasing traffic demand of passengers and shippers. We proactively negotiate liberal air services agreements with our bilateral partners that enable our aviation network to continue to expand. We also maintain a robust regulatory regime in line with international standards to support an efficient, safe and secure air transport system.


Indeed, our regulatory efforts have been guided by the ICAO. Through local legislation and enforcement action, ICAO standards and practices are implemented in Hong Kong in an effective and timely manner. Hong Kong participates actively in ICAO activities as a member of the People's Republic of China delegation. In recent years, we have also stepped up our co-operation with other aviation authorities, particularly in areas such as rationalizing airspace, streamlining air routes, and mutual recognition of certification. We devote these worthwhile efforts with an overall objective in mind: that is, to maintain the highest safety standards for air services whilst creating a facilitating environment for commercial operators.


Looking to the future, we should expect to see the continuation of a rapidly changing aviation scene, which will bring with it ever more challenging tasks for regulators. There are at least three areas of challenges. First, the global trend towards greater liberalization is allowing more new airlines to enter the market. New airports are being built, and existing ones expanded. These developments substantially increase the workload and complexity of the regulatory authorities. Secondly, traditional network carriers and low-cost carriers alike are introducing cost-saving measures to improve their competitiveness and indeed to improve their profits. Regulators need to ensure that safety is in no way compromised. And thirdly, increasing air traffic also calls for new navigation technologies, timely training of human resources, more cost-effective air routes, and better co-ordination amongst regulators.


These tasks are challenging for the industry, as well as, for the regulators. As such, the importance of closer co-operation within the aviation sector cannot be over-stressed. This Conference provides a valuable platform for regulators to share experience and to strengthen the partnership required to support the long-term development of air services.


On this note, I wish you all a successful and rewarding Conference and a most pleasant stay in Hong Kong.


Thank you.

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Speech by DGCA at opening ceremony of 41st DGCAs conference


1 November 2004


Following is the speech (English only) by the Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Norman Lo, at the opening ceremony of the 41st Conference of Directors General of Civil Aviation, Asia and Pacific Regions, at Conrad Hong Kong Hotel today (November 1):


Mr Henry Tang, Dr Taieb Cherif, Mr Lalit Shah, Ms Sandra Lee, Directors General, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen,


The Civil Aviation Department of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region is privileged and honoured to be the host of the 41st Conference of Directors General of Civil Aviation, Asia and Pacific Regions. Please accept our warmest welcome to the conference.


Fellow Directors General will recall that at the last DGCA Conference in Mongolia, we had quite a deliberation on the theme topic for this year's Conference and in the end we have chosen "Partnership in Achieving a Safe, Secure and Efficient Air Transport System through Effective Safety Oversight". We all believe that every stakeholder in the civil aviation community has an individual role to play in contributing to the safe, secure and efficient air transport system. And through effective partnership, we are able to strengthen our capability in enhancing our air transport system. This can only be done by integrating the best people, equipment, knowledge and expertise available around us.


I would like to take this opportunity to share with fellow Directors General, through deliberation at the conference, how the authorities in the regions, and each member of the Hong Kong civil aviation community work interactively and collaboratively with each other.


We treasure the importance of the establishment of partnership between various stakeholders in the regions. During conference discussion, I urge all of you to share your thoughts and experience on various agenda items such as aviation safety and security, air navigation planning, technical co-operation and CNS/ATM implementation activities. The sharing of our unique experience in various areas, not only will make the discussion fruitful and rewarding, but will also help resolving various common issues.


I am sure you all remember, not too long ago, we worked together in difficult times during the economic slowdown and the outbreak of SARS in the region. With the concerted effort of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), authorities in the regions, airports and airline operators, the Asia and Pacific regions had experienced quite a robust growth in aviation business since the beginning of this year. I am proud to say that our Hong Kong International Airport has become one of the busiest airports in the world in terms of international passenger and cargo throughput. I am pleased to say that not only we have recovered, we have come out even stronger.


Finally, I would like to conclude my speech by quoting a statement made by the President of ICAO, Dr Kotaite, in his address at the opening of the 35th Session of the Assembly a few weeks ago: "We must work together towards safe and secure skies, safe and secure airports, protecting the environment, and supporting a sound, stable and revitalised industry."


Dear fellow Directors General, let's build on our good and co-operative relationship to work towards that goal. We will create a win-win partnership for all the states and territories in the Asia Pacific regions! And remember together we fly, and we will fly further and higher.


Thank you.

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HK hosts 41st Conference of Directors General of Civil Aviation


1 November 2004


The Financial Secretary, Mr Henry Tang, and the Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Norman Lo, officiated at the opening ceremony of the 41st Conference of Directors General of Civil Aviation, Asia and Pacific Regions, today (November 1).


Also officiating at the ceremony were the Secretary-General of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), Dr Taieb Cherif; and the Regional Director of ICAO, Mr Lalit Shah.


Addressing the conference, the Financial Secretary, Mr Henry Tang, said that air transport facilitates trade and investment, promoted tourism, and brought people together.


"Apart from serving a vital support function, the aviation industry is, in its own rights, an important component of the global economy. Hong Kong is located at the heart of Asia and sits at the gateway of the Mainland of China. Our government and our aviation community have worked in a close partnership for the past decades to make Hong Kong a major aviation hub," Mr Tang said.


"In recent years, we have also stepped up our co-operation with other aviation authorities, particularly in areas such as rationalising airspace, streamlining air routes, and mutual recognition of certification. We devote these worthwhile efforts with an overall objective in mind: that is, to maintain the highest safety standards for air services whilst creating a facilitating environment for commercial operators.


"This conference provides a valuable platform for regulators to share experience and to strengthen the partnership required to support the long-term development of air services," Mr Tang said.


Speaking at the conference, the Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Norman Lo, said that every stakeholder in the civil aviation community had an individual role to play in contributing to the safe, secure and efficient air transport system.


"Through effective partnership, we were able to strengthen our capability in enhancing our air transport system through integrating the best people, equipment, knowledge and expertise available around us," Mr Lo said.


"Not too long ago, we worked together in difficult times during the economic slowdown and the outbreak of SARS in the region. With the concerted effort of the ICAO, authorities in the regions, airports and airline operators, the Asia and Pacific regions had experienced quite a robust growth in aviation business since the beginning of this year. I am proud to say that our Hong Kong International Airport has become one of the busiest airports in the world in terms of international passenger and cargo throughput."


The conference with a theme topic "Partnership in Achieving a Safe, Secure and Efficient Air Transport System through Effective Safety Oversight" is hosted by the Civil Aviation Department from November 1 to 5 at the Conrad Hong Kong Hotel. More than 170 delegates from 38 states/territories including the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Australia, Japan, Singapore, Thailand and the Macau Special Administrative Region have come to Hong Kong to participate. Also attended were the Vice-Minister of the General Administration of Civil Aviation of China, Mr Wang Changshun, and representatives from the ICAO.


Items on the agenda include the theme of the conference, air navigation planning and implementation, Communications Navigation Surveillance/Air Traffic Management implementation, aviation safety, aviation security, air transport and technical co-operation. A study tour will also be arranged for the delegates, with visits to some civil aviation organisations to increase their better understanding of the local industry.


For the purpose of enhancing communication and co-operation among aeronautical authorities of member states, the ICAO saw the advantage of organising a high-level conference aimed at participation by Directors General of Civil Aviation on a regional basis. The first conference for the Asia and Pacific regions was held in 1960. The conference has since become more or less an annual event.


Although organised under the auspices of ICAO, the conference is held around cities in the region with the aeronautical authority of the state/territory concerned as the host. Hong Kong is a supporter of the conference and has actively participated in the event in its capacity of Hong Kong, China. Hong Kong was the host of the conference in 1962.

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CAD to issue special stamp to mark opening of conference


25 October 2004


The Civil Aviation Department will host the 41st Conference of Directors General of Civil Aviation, Asia and Pacific Regions, in November, with the theme, "Partnership in Achieving a Safe, Secure and Efficient Air Transport System through Effective Safety Oversight".


To tie in with the theme of the conference, the department will, for the first time, issue a special mini-pane of "Heartwarming Stamps" named "Together We Fly" on October 30, 2004 (Saturday).


The mini-pane contains 16 stamps featuring different major aviation organisations to highlight the invaluable contributions and support from the aviation community and the appreciation for partnerships between various aviation organisations and government departments.


The mini-pane will be available for sale at the General Post Office (G/F, near the Postal Gallery) in Central on October 30, 2004 (Saturday) from 9am to 6pm, while stocks last.


Details of the stamp products, their selling prices and sales quota for each queuing customer are as follows:


Product: "Together We Fly" - "Heartwarming Stamps" mini-pane with paper holder.


Product details: A mini-pane contains 16 "Heartwarming Stamps" in local mail postage with stamp design of "Care & Love". Stamp tabs are imprinted with images of major aviation-related organisations in Hong Kong. A specially designed paper holder is included to protect the stamps


Unit price: $65


Sales quota: 5 sets


Product: "Together We Fly" - "Heartwarming Stamps" Souvenir Covers Set


Product details: A set of 16 souvenir covers with different designs; each features one of the aviation-related organisations affixed with a designated "Heartwarming Stamps". The covers are cancelled with the "Airport" pictorial postmark dated October 30, 2004.


Unit price: $70


Sales quota: 5 sets


Product: "Together We Fly" Souvenir Covers Set


Product details: A set of 16 souvenir covers with different designs, each features one of the aviation-related organisations.


Unit price: $16


Sales quota: 5 sets

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CAD to host major civil aviation conference in November


25 October 2004


The Civil Aviation Department will host the 41st Conference of Directors General of Civil Aviation, Asia and Pacific Regions, from November 1 to 5, 2004. The theme of the conference is "Partnership in Achieving a Safe, Secure and Efficient Air Transport System through Effective Safety Oversight."


The Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Norman Lo, said the hosting of the conference would enhance Hong Kong's position as an international civil aviation hub, project the image of Hong Kong as Asia's world city and provide an opportunity for counterparts in the region to witness Hong Kong's development.


"Hong Kong was the host of the conference in 1962 and it is a pleasure to be the host again this year," Mr Lo said.


More than 170 delegates from 38 states/territories in the region, including the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Australia, Japan, Singapore, Thailand and the Macao Special Administrative Region, will participate in this year's conference to be held at the Conrad Hong Kong. The Secretary-General of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), Dr Taieb Cherif; Regional Director of ICAO, Mr Lalit Shah; and Vice Minister of the General Administration of Civil Aviation of China, Mr Wang Changshun, will also attend.


Items on the agenda include the theme of the conference, air navigation planning and implementation, Communications Navigation Surveillance/Air Traffic Management (CNS/ATM) implementation, aviation safety, aviation security, air transport and technical co-operation.


During the five-day conference, apart from the presentation of discussion papers and information papers by the states/territories in the region, a study tour for delegates will also be included. Participants will be invited to take a day trip to see some of Asia's world city. Briefings on past and future developments of particular interest will be given during the tour. Visits to some civil aviation organisations will also be arranged to increase understanding of the aviation industry in Hong Kong.


For the purpose of enhancing communication and cooperation among aeronautical authorities of member states, the ICAO saw the advantage of organising a high-level conference aimed at participation by Directors General of Civil Aviation on a regional basis. The first conference for the Asia-Pacific Region was held in 1960. The conference has since become more or less an annual event.


Although organised under the auspices of ICAO, the conference is held around cities in the region with the aeronautical authority of the state/region concerned as the host.


Hong Kong is a supporter of the conference and has actively participated in the event in its capacity of Hong Kong, China.

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Flight standards safety seminar for the Asia-Pacific Region successfully held in Hong Kong

17 June 2004

A three-day Flight Standards Safety Seminar for the Asia-Pacific Region civil aviation authorities (CAAs) jointly organised by the Civil Aviation Department and the United States Federal Aviation Administration ended today (June 17) with success.

The seminar aimed to promote flight safety and to foster co-operation and collaboration of Flight Standards personnel in the region. More than 50 Flight Standards and Airworthiness personnel from 13 aviation authorities, and 50 participants from various aviation organisations such as airline operators, pilots and airlines associations were present.

Speaking at today's closing ceremony Acting Deputy Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Y K Leung, said: "Aviation is a dynamic and advancing industry. There are always new technologies available for us to improve our performance and to enhance safety. The gist is whether we can fully utilise the technological know-how through co-operation among the authorities and industry partners. This seminar is another example of such good partnership."

"We come together to share the new technologies available to us and our experiences in making good use of them. I hope you can take back to your organisations the information exchanged during this seminar and make good use of it at work," he added.

During the seminar, participants shared information about the regulatory activities that CAAs must accomplish in transitioning to the new aviation technologies.

Specifically, the seminar concentrated on the activities that CAAs must be actively involved to provide the necessary operational and airworthiness approvals related to new aviation technologies and developments.

Fruitful discussions were made on a variety of topics including training requirements for Flight Standards personnel, English language requirements of the International Civil Aviation Organisation for pilot licensing, approach and landing accident reduction, windshear and turbulence warning system, and aviation security enhancement, etc.

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Approval for airlines to levy fuel surcharges

31 May 2004

The Civil Aviation Department (CAD) today (May 31) approved the filings submitted by Cathay Pacific Airways (CX) and Hong Kong Dragon Airlines (KA) to levy a fuel surcharge on passenger carriage in view of the recent increase in aviation fuel prices.

CX was approved to collect US$5 and US$14 (or HK$ equivalent) per sector per passenger for their short-haul and long-haul flights respectively, while KA was approved to levy HK$42 per sector per passenger.

CAD today also granted approvals to the three Mainland carriers, namely China Eastern Airlines, China Southern Airlines and Air China to impose a fuel surcharge on their passenger carriage at the level of HK$42 per sector.

So far, CAD approvals have been given to 13 passenger carriers. Apart from the above five airlines, the other international carriers which received approval were South African Airways, Air Canada, Australian Airlines, Qantas Airways, Virgin Atlantic Airways, Emirates, Air India and Gulf Air. Their surcharge levels range from US$4 to US$10.

The approved surcharges will remain valid until August 31, 2004.

CAD has considered the filings on the merits of each application, having regard to established policies and relevant provisions in the concerned bilateral air services agreements, including the basis for determining the proposed surcharge; whether the airline concerned had levied or proposed similar surcharge on other routes; the period for which the surcharge would remain valid; overall operating costs of the airlines concerned; interests of the travelling public; and tariffs (including surcharges) of other airlines operating on the same routes.

Applications for fuel surcharges from six international passenger carriers are still being considered by CAD.

Fuel surcharges for passenger carriage of seven airlines, ranging from HK$40 to HK$156 per sector, were last approved in March and April, 2003, for a period of three months.

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PLA displays search-and-rescue capabilities at CAD exercise

31 May 2004

The Hong Kong Garrison of the People's Liberation Army (PLA) and various Government departments joined hands to display their search-and-rescue capabilities during a short-range demonstration today (May 31).

The event, organised by the Civil Aviation Department (CAD), took place at Kwo Chau Islands.

The short-range search-and-rescue exercise was designed to strengthen cooperation and coordination between the search-and-rescue units of the CAD and PLA, and to enhance technical exchanges between various search-and-rescue units of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government and PLA.

The various search-and-rescue units included those from the Government Flying Service (GFS), Civil Aid Service, Fire Services Department (FSD), Marine Police and Marine Department.

"Under Annex 12 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation, a Contracting State is obliged to provide search-and-rescue services within its designated search-and-rescue region. Since unification with our motherland, the PLA has been giving us tremendous support by participating in our annual SAR exercises, which is very important to further improving our search-and-rescue procedures and system," the Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Norman Lo said.

"Should an air accident occur within our airspace, we have a critical situation where every second counts. It is vital that we launch SAR operations efficiently. And we, here in Hong Kong, are fortunate enough to enlist PLA's support with its SAR facilities and assistance," he said.

In April 2004, the CAD signed the Co-operation Arrangement on Aircraft Accident Investigation and Search and Rescue with the General Administration of Civil Aviation of China (CAAC) in Beijing with a view to establishing a cooperation arrangement and procedures to facilitate search-and-rescue as well as further the coordination and communication of both sides.

Assistance from the Mainland will be sought for the purpose of search-and-rescue and salvage of the wreckage should an aircraft accident or serious incident occur in the Hong Kong Flight Information Region, which covers an area of 276,000 square kilometres extending over the South China Sea.

Both Hong Kong and the Mainland will also be responsible for ensuring that an investigation into the accident or serious incident is organised and shall act as a "Rescue Co-ordination Centre" according to the location of accident/serious incident and the aircraft state/place of registry as stated in the Co-operation Arrangement.

In today's exercise, the PLA provided unprecedented resources and mobilised two naval vessels, a Z9 helicopter and around 30 officers to take part.

The exercise involved a demonstration by the diving unit of the FSD, and simulated deck-winching by the Z9 helicopter and an Eurocopter Super Puma AS332 L2 helicopter of the GFS. The simulated survivor from the PLA was taken to the Hospital of PLA Forces at Jordan Road, Kowloon by the Z9 helicopter. The GFS also provided a Jetstream J41 aircraft on scene to coordinate the search-and-rescue activities.

More than 20 senior officials from CAAC and Mainland rescue, surveillance and savage units came to Hong Kong to observe the demonstration.

"The active support of the PLA has provided us and other participating Government departments an invaluable opportunity to exchange technology and experiences. I am confident that today's exercise will help enhance our search-and-rescue capabilities as well as lay a sound foundation on which similar exercises can be conducted in future," Mr Lo added.

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Arrangement Concluded with the Mainland on Aircraft Accident Investigation & Search and Rescue

7 April 2004

The Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Albert Lam signed a Co-operation Arrangement on Aircraft Accident Investigation and Search and Rescue with the Director-General, Office of Aviation Safety, the General Administration of Civil Aviation of China (CAAC), Mr Wang Sui-fa in Beijing today (April 7).

To further the co-operation of both sides, assistance from the Mainland will be sought for the purpose of search and rescue (SAR) and salvage of the wreckage should an aircraft accident or serious incident occur in the Hong Kong Flight Information Region, which covers an area of 276,000 square kilometres extending over the South China Sea.

Both Hong Kong and the Mainland will also be responsible for ensuring that an investigation into the accident or serious incident is organised and shall act as a "Rescue Co-ordination Centre" according to the location of accident/serious incident and the aircraft state/place of registry as stated in the Co-operation Arrangement.

"Two years ago, Hong Kong initiated discussions with our Mainland counterparts with a view to establishing a co-operation arrangement and procedures with which resources in the Mainland can be mobilised in the event of aircraft emergencies," Mr Lam said

"Both parties recognise the importance of carrying out investigation and SAR with the greatest diligence and with the full co-operation of the concerned parties. The Co-operation Arrangement is signed to promote, develop and reinforce our co-operation in carrying out investigation of aircraft accidents, serious incidents and SAR; and to facilitate mutual communications and exchange of technical information in this connection."

"The signing of the Co-operation Arrangement not only demonstrates our commitment to providing an efficient SAR system which is essential in time of aircraft distress, but it also signifies the very important continual support from our motherland," Mr Lam said.

The signing ceremony was witnessed by CAAC Vice-minister Mr Liu Shao-yong and Director, Office of Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau Affairs, CAAC, Mr Pu Zhao-zhou.

Mr Liu said: "The signing of this Co-operation Arrangement will definitely have a positive impact on the co-operative development in aviation to both sides."

"With his record of distinctive performance, Mr Lam leaves with us yet another wonderful chapter on the two sides' successful co-operation in aviation shortly before he bids farewell to the Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department. I believe the signing of this Co-operation Arrangement marks a new era in our co-operation, and we hope Mr Lam will continue to show his concern and give support to aviation development in the Mainland and Hong Kong," he added.

The signing ceremony forms part of the programme of Mr Lam's one-week official visit to Beijing and Shanghai. Headed by Mr Lam, the Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department delegation comprises two Assistant Directors-General and two senior officers.

Among the senior officials Mr Lam will meet during his Beijing visit are CAAC Minister Captain Yang Yuan-yuan and Vice-minister Mr Gao Hong-feng, as well as the senior management of the Office of State Air Traffic Control Commission, CAAC's Air Traffic Management Bureau, Department of Flight Standards, Department of Aircraft Airworthiness, the Ministry of Public Security, the Department of International Affairs and Co-operation, Department of Transport and Department of Airport, as well as The Office of the Government of the HKSAR in Beijing, and China National Aviation Corporation.

While in Shanghai, Mr Lam will meet the senior management of the East China Regional Administration of CAAC and its Air Traffic Management Bureau, as well as China Eastern Airlines.

Apart from signing the Co-operation Arrangement, the purposes of the visit are to review the working relationship of the two parties throughout the years, discuss aviation issues that are of mutual interest, and to explore means to strengthen future co-operation.

Discussion topics cover Pearl River Delta Air Traffic Management Planning and Implementation, the Satellite-based Communications, Navigation and Surveillance/Air Traffic Management Systems applications, latest development of the Co-operation Arrangement on mutual acceptance of approval of aircraft maintenance organisations signed by aviation authorities in the Mainland, Hong Kong and Macau, implementation of the Regulated Agent Regime in Hong Kong to enhance air cargo security, safe transport of dangerous goods by air, and security audit conducted by the International Civil Aviation Organisation.

The delegation will return to Hong Kong on Tuesday (April 13).

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International Flight Movements Register 3% Increase in Summer Season

31 March 2004

A total of 122 more scheduled passenger and cargo services will operate to and from Hong Kong on a weekly basis this summer season (March 28 to October 30), compared with the winter season.

This pushes the total number of flight movements at Hong Kong International Airport to more than 4,540 per week, which is an increase of about 3% over the winter season, a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Department said today (March 31).

In the new season, 156 additional scheduled passenger and cargo services will be provided per week. At the same time, 34 services have been cancelled, making a net increase of 122.

More than half of the additional passenger services operate between Hong Kong and the Mainland, notably Shanghai and Chengdu. The two destinations register an increase of 24 and 10 weekly services respectively, taking the total frequencies to 189 and 25 per week.

The surge can be largely attributed to the higher demand for air services to Hong Kong by individual Mainland travellers. With the addition of 75 services per week, the number of weekly air services between Hong Kong and the Mainland stands at more than 600, that is, over 1,200 flight movements.

Six carriers have launched new passenger services to and from Hong Kong in the summer season. These are thrice weekly services to Perth by Qantas Airways, thrice weekly services to Munich by Lufthansa German Airlines, and twice weekly services to Siem Reap by President Airlines, all from the start of the season; as well as seven times weekly services to Tokyo by Hong Kong Dragon Airlines from April 1, and twice weekly services to Ho Chi Ming City by Pacific Airlines from June 24. Between June 19 and October 2, China Southern Airlines will operate passenger services between Urumqi and Hong Kong.

Both Siem Reap and Urumqi are new destinations in Hong Kong's scheduled air services network.

Taipei still has the most number of flights to and from Hong Kong. With the addition of 19 passenger services per week, the number of weekly services between Hong Kong and Taipei is 295, that is, 590 flight movements.

At present, 71 airlines offer scheduled passenger and cargo services from Hong Kong to about 130 destinations worldwide. Air traffic controllers can handle as many as 50 aircraft movements during peak hours.

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Announcement of Senior Appointments

30 March 2004

The Government announced today (March 30) the appointment of Mr Norman Lo Shung Man, Deputy Director-General of Civil Aviation, to succeed Mr Albert Lam Kwong Yu as Director-General of Civil Aviation with effect from April 17, 2004. Mr Lam will proceed on pre-retirement leave on the same day.

The Secretary for the Civil Service, Mr Joseph W P Wong, expressed full confidence in Mr Lo's appointment.

Mr Wong said : "Mr Norman Lo has profound professional knowledge and rich experience in the aviation field. Together with his proven leadership and administrative skills, I am confident that he will be able to lead the Civil Aviation Department in facing the challenges ahead. I am sure that the staff of the department will continue to give their best under his leadership."

"I would also like to thank Mr Lam for his dedicated and meritorious service in the government for more than 41 years," he added.

The Secretary for Economic Development and Labour, Mr Stephen Ip, thanked Mr Albert Lam for his valuable contribution to the development of Hong Kong as an international and regional aviation center.

Mr Ip said :"With his professionalism and wealth of experience, Mr Lam has made significant contribution to the sustained development of Hong Kong's aviation sector. Under his leadership, the Civil Aviation Department has witnessed the move of our airport from Kai Tak to Chek Lap Kok and made every effort to support the burgeoning industry. Mr Lam has also played a pivotal role in developing and maintaining a world-class civil aviation regulatory regime for Hong Kong. I have full confidence in Mr Norman Lo in taking up this challenging job and look forward to working closely with him to further enhance Hong Kong's position as an international aviation hub."

The government also announced the appointment of Mr Leung Yu Keung, Assistant Director-General of Civil Aviation, to succeed Mr Lo as Deputy Director-General of Civil Aviation with effect from April 17, 2004.

The biographical notes on Messrs Albert Lam Kwong Yu and Norman Lo Shung Man are as follows:

Mr Albert Lam Kwong-yu, JP
--------------------------

Aged 59, Mr Lam joined the Civil Aviation Department as a Control Assistant in November, 1962. He rose through the ranks to Airport General Manager in October, 1994, and Deputy Director-General of Civil Aviation in July, 1996. He has been the Director-General of Civil Aviation since October, 1998.

Mr Lam will proceed on pre-retirement leave with effect from April 17, 2004, after more than 41 years of service with the government.

Mr Norman Lo Shung-man, JP
--------------------------

Aged 47, Mr Lo joined the Hong Kong Civil Service as a Student Radiographer in the then Medical and Health Department in October, 1976. He joined the Civil Aviation Department as a Student Air Traffic Control Officer in January, 1977. He was appointed as Operations Officer in January, 1988, and was promoted to Senior Operations Officer in April, 1994, to Chief Operations Officer in September, 1996, to Assistant Director of Civil Aviation in December, 1997, and to Deputy Director-General of Civil Aviation in May, 2002. Mr Lo is also a professional pilot.

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Mount Parker New Route Surveillance Radar Commissioned

30 March 2004

The surveillance capability of the Hong Kong air traffic control system is further enhanced with the commissioning of a new Route Surveillance Radar (RSR) at Mount Parker, Quarry Bay. This helps maximise airspace capacity and ensure flight safety.

 “With incorporation of the latest technology and design, the performance of the new fully solid state RSR is superior to the old one in terms of stability, reliability, signal processing, accuracy and target detection capability during inclement weather,” the Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Albert Lam, said today (March 30) when officiating at a ceremony launching the new RSR.

“This project comprises the demolishment of the old radar in September 2003, and installation and commissioning of the new radar in four months. I am pleased that our engineers were able to complete the project on time under trying circumstances such as disruption of works by typhoon last September,” Mr Lam added. 

The new RSR replaces the one installed at Mount Parker in 1978 for the former Hong Kong International Airport at Kai Tak. For more than 25 years, the old radar served as a primary surveillance radar (PSR) with coverage of 200 nautical miles for en-route air traffic surveillance. It is necessary to replace the old radar because of its age and difficulty in acquiring spares.

PSR is a radio detection equipment that provides information on range and bearing of aircraft in the form of a target blip on the radar screen to air traffic controllers by transmitting radar pulses and detecting the reflected signals from the aircraft. No active transponder or avionics on board aircraft has to be relied on.

With the new radar antenna encased within a radome, the radar system can work continuously under all weather conditions even during typhoon. The radar antenna measures 9.7 metres high and 13.7 metres wide, while the radome has a diametre of 15 metres.

Opportunity was also taken during the radar replacement process to renovate the station including standby generator, fuel tank, power supply system and fire fighting system, etc. so as to ensure that the refurbished facilities can support the operation of the new RSR for another 20 to 25 years.

Prior to acceptance of the new RSR, a flight inspection team of the General Administration of Civil Aviation of China conducted the commissioning flight checks to certify that the system can work properly.

Funding approval for this HK$60 million project was obtained from the Finance Committee of the Legislative Council in 2001. Through open tendering, Alenia Marconi Systems (AMS) of Italy is chosen as the supplier of the new radar. Its local representative is Chinney Alliance Engineering Limited.

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HKCAD Official Chairs International Committee Meeting on Airport Facilitation

28 March 2004

Hong Kong's leading status in the global aviation arena is again recognised with the unanimous election of a Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department  (CAD) senior official to chair a committee of a major international meeting on airport facilitation.

Headed by the Deputy Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Norman Lo, a seven-member Hong Kong delegation comprising representatives from CAD, Customs and Excise Department, Immigration Department, Department of Health and the Airport Authority Hong Kong attend the 12th Session of the Facilitation Division Meeting of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) in Cairo, Egypt from March 22 to April 2.

These Hong Kong representatives, together with the Macao delegation, joins their Mainland counterparts headed by Deputy Director General, Department of International Affairs and Cooperation, General Administration of Civil Aviation of China, Mr Wu Zhou-hong to form a 22-member strong China delegation.

On the first day of the meeting, CAD's Chief Operations Officer (Security), Mr Simon Li was elected unanimously as the Chairman of one of the two deliberative committees.
The committee chaired by Mr Li deals with implementation of aviation security, facilitation and security of air cargo services, airport facilities and service delivery systems, international health regulations and other facilitation matters.

The two-week meeting is attended by about 330 delegates from 76 countries and 15 international organisations. They include senior officials in the various areas of facilitation, such as those dealing with airport, customs, immigration, passport issuance, security, public health and tourism matters.

The ICAO Facilitation Division Meeting is convened for two purposes. The first one is to formulate recommendations for revisions to Annex 9 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation – Facilitation. The second one is to develop specific policy recommendations for adoption by the ICAO.

Since the last meeting in 1995, significant advancements have occurred in technology, travel document security, telecommunications and management of inspection systems at airports which call for a new mandate from Contracting States to guide ICAO facilitation policy over the next decade.

The 12th Session of the Division focuses its attention on broad policy issues and strategies, including new strategies based on the interdependence of security and facilitation.

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Speech by SEDL at opening ceremony of annual conference of IFATCA

22 March 2004

Following is the speech by the Secretary for Economic Development and Labour, Mr Stephen Ip, at opening ceremony of the 43rd Annual Conference of the International Federation of Air Traffic Controllers' Associations (IFATCA) today (March 22) (English only):

Marc, Albert, Andrew, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen,

It gives me great pleasure to be here at the 43rd Annual Conference of the International Federation of Air Traffic Controllers' Associations. First of all, I would like to extend a very warm welcome to all of you, particularly to those who have travelled a long way to Hong Kong. We are honoured to host the biggest IFATCA Conference ever held in the Asia Pacific region with over 70 participating members of the federation. For that, I would like to thank IFATCA for choosing Hong Kong as the venue; the Civil Aviation Department and the Hong Kong Air Traffic Control Association for putting together such a prestigious international event.

The aviation business is an exciting and dynamic industry. It plays a key role in driving the global economic development and facilitating communication across the world. As one of the busiest aviation hubs in the world, the Hong Kong International Airport now handles close to 200,000 aircraft movements annually and processes over 34 million passengers and 2.6 million tonnes of cargo each year. The control tower at Chek Lap Kok steers some 90,000 aircraft overflying Hong Kong each year, through our sophisticated and professional ATC services. This is no mean achievement and I am proud of having such a highly professional ATC team to make all this possible.

Looking ahead, as more airports open in different parts of the world, and airlines flying to more destinations to meet increasing demands of the travelling public, I envisage air traffic worldwide to grow in leaps and bounds. As air travel continues to grow, airspace and airport congestion problems are becoming more acute. All these call for more sophisticated, efficient and well-coordinated ATC services worldwide. Answers to these challenges lie in enhancing the reliability of ATC hardware and software, harmonising ATC rules and protocols, maintaining a vigilant oversight of ATC standards, and investing in human resources to ensure that ATC professionals are well-trained to meet the highest standards.

Ladies and gentlemen, this is a tall order for all of us. An order which allows absolutely no room for compromise in the standard of air safety that we owe to the travelling public. As the Secretary responsible for aviation, I am pleased to see that IFATCA and its members are holding fast to this common vision. I am sure that today's conference will provide a useful platform for ATC professionals from all over the world to share experience and insights and foster closer cooperation.

I wish all of you a very fruitful and rewarding conference. For delegates from overseas, I wish you a pleasant and enjoyable stay in Hong Kong. As the Secretary also responsible for tourism, I hope you will be able to find time to do some shopping and sightseeing.

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HK hosts five-day international air traffic controllers conference

22 March 2004

The Secretary for Economic Development and Labour, Mr Stephen Ip, and the Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Albert Lam today (March 22) officiated at the opening ceremony of an annual conference attended by more than 800 air traffic controllers and aviation experts from almost 80 countries worldwide.

This is the second time that the Annual Conference of the International Federation of Air Traffic Controllers' Associations (IFATCA) and Technical Exhibition has been held in Asia in 43 years. It is also one of the IFATCA Annual Conferences with the biggest attendance on record.

Addressing the opening of the conference, Mr Ip said: "The aviation business is an exciting and dynamic industry. It plays a key role in driving the global economic development and facilitating communication across the world.

"As one of the busiest aviation hubs in the world, the Hong Kong International Airport now handles close to 200,000 aircraft movements annually and processes over 34 million passengers and 2.6 million tonnes of cargo each year. The control tower steers some 90,000 aircraft overflying Hong Kong each year, through our sophisticated and professional air traffic control (ATC) services. This is no mean achievement and I am proud of having such a highly professional ATC team to make all this possible.

"Looking ahead, as more airports open in different parts of the world, and with airlines flying to more destinations to meet the increasing demands of the travelling public, I envisage air traffic worldwide will grow in leaps and bounds. As air travel continues to grow, airspace and airport congestion problems are becoming more acute. All these call for more sophisticated, efficient and well-coordinated ATC services worldwide. Answers to these challenges lie in enhancing the reliability of ATC hardware and software, harmonising ATC rules and protocols, maintaining a vigilant oversight of ATC standards, and investing in human resources to ensure that ATC professionals are well-trained to meet the highest standards," he added.

Mr Ip's remarks were echoed by Mr Lam, who said at the opening ceremony that: "No matter how advanced the equipment on the ground or in the aircraft may be in future, the concerted efforts and professional expertise of fellow members of the ATC profession are absolutely indispensable to making all these systems run harmoniously with a view to maintaining a safe, efficient and orderly flow of air traffic services."

According to the latest forecasts by the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO), world airline passenger traffic is expected to rebound at 4.4% and 6.3%, respectively, in 2004 and 2005. Mr Lam called on air traffic controllers worldwide to make an effort to improve efficiency, regularity of air services and cost-effectiveness of air traffic management, which are vital to improving passenger convenience and airline operations in terms of fewer delays and shorter flight times.

The theme of this year's conference is "Our Future". Aspects concerning aviation safety in general and the ATC profession in particular will be discussed during the five-day event at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre.

IFATCA is an independent non-government, non-political, professional organisation representing over 40,000 air traffic controllers in more than 120 countries. The mission of the federation is to protect and safeguard the interests of the ATC profession. Among its goals are to promote safety, efficiency, and regularity in international air navigation, to assist and advise in the development of safe and orderly systems of ATC and new procedures and facilities, to promote and uphold a high standard of knowledge and professional efficiency among air traffic controllers, to closely cooperate with international and national aviation authorities and institutions concerned with air navigation, and to sponsor and support the passage of legislation and regulations which will increase and protect the safety of air navigation. These goals are achieved by close co-operation with air traffic management providers, regulatory authorities, aircraft operators and the aviation industry.

Observers from international organisations such as ICAO, International Federation of Air Line Pilots' Associations, International Air Transport Association, Airports Council International, and Eurocontrol Agency, have also come to Hong Kong for the conference.

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US FAA Administrator Visits Hong Kong

29 February 2004

As part of her extensive eight-day tour of the Asian Pacific region, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Administrator Marion C. Blakey met today (February 29) with the Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Albert Lam in Hong Kong to promote increased cooperation on international aviation issues.

The visit marks the first official visit by a United States' top aviation official.

"I am glad to have this opportunity to introduce to Ms Blakey the latest developments of the Hong Kong aviation sector," Mr. Lam said. "This is beneficial to enhancing our working relationships to ensure that a safe and efficient air transport system is in place."

"The FAA is most eager to work with the Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department (CAD) to achieve a seamless, global aviation system," Ms Blakey said. "We can do this. It's within our reach if we make it a global priority. As we chart the next century of aviation, it will be through cooperation that citizens from Hong Kong, the United States, and the world will be able to fly safely, seamlessly, and efficiently across borders...and around the globe."

The focus of the Administrator's Hong Kong visit is to discuss technology and better understand the latest initiatives adopted by CAD as an aviation regulator and an air traffic services provider.

Blakey's visit included tours of Hong Kong International Airport's (HKIA) Air Traffic Control Centre, the Aerodrome Tower, and the state-of-the-art fire fighting and rescue equipment of the Airport Fire Contingent, including one of its two high-speed catamaran vessels. In addition, Blakey looked at the airport's innovative Backup Air Traffic Control Complex (BATCX). HKIA is the only airport in the Asia Pacific region that has a BATCX to ensure continued air traffic control operation in the event of any unexpected circumstances that may render the main facility inaccessible.

Prior to the airport visit, Ms Blakey took a ride on a Government Flying Service (GFS) EC155 helicopter. It allowed the Administrator to better understand the operations of GFS and how they comply with the safety requirements of CAD.

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High-level Meeting to Enhance Air Traffic Management in PRD

22 February 2004

The Director-General of Civil Aviation, Mr Albert Lam, will participate in a high-level meeting with his Mainland and Macao counterparts to map out the future Air Traffic Management (ATM) Plan in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) area.

As a continuous effort to ensure the safety and efficiency of air traffic management in one of the busiest airspaces in the world, Mr Lam will lead a team of air traffic and engineering professionals to participate in the 1st PRD ATM Planning and Implementation Working Group Meeting in Dalian beginning Wednesday (February 25).   

The meeting will be chaired by the Director-General of Air Traffic Management Bureau, General Administration of Civil Aviation of China (CAAC), Mr Su Langen. Other senior CAAC officials from Beijing will also join the two-day meeting.  

Amongst the issues to be covered are the development of a working model on the strategic planning and implementation of air traffic control (ATC) procedures in PRD, means to further enhance the efficiency of ATC operations in PRD, and introduction by CAAC of flight procedures of the new Guangzhou Baiyun International Airport scheduled to commence operations in mid-2004 in Huadu.   

“I am very pleased to be able to participate in this meeting to join hands with the ATC experts in the Mainland and Macao to devise a long-term and comprehensive ATM plan for PRD. This area, which commands a strategic location in Asia Pacific region, is experiencing rapid growth in air traffic,” Mr Lam said. 

He noted that the overall air traffic volume in PRD was steadily on the rise despite some unfortunate setbacks caused by the September 11 incidents and the outbreak of SARS. 

“The aviation market in PRD has tremendous potential for stronger growth. I hope that through the joint efforts with my Mainland and Macao counterparts, we will further enhance the use of airspaces and air traffic management in this area. In so doing, we can better promote the development of the aviation sector in PRD and ensure its continuous growth in a wholesome manner,” Mr Lam added. 

Mr Lam will also visit the Middle and Southern Administration of CAAC in Guangzhou and meet with its Director-General, Mr Wang Jiwu and other senior officials of the Administration before returning to Hong Kong.

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Safe Carriage of Dangerous Goods & Restricted Articles by Air

17 January 2004

As the number of air passengers at the Hong Kong International Airport (HKIA) is expected to skyrocket in the approaching Chinese New Year holidays, the Civil Aviation Department (CAD) today (January 17) reminds these travellers on the importance of the safe carriage of dangerous goods and restricted articles. They will enjoy a smooth and fast check-in as well as a safe and worry-free air journey without improperly carrying these items.

According to CAD, a total of 916 slot applications for operating extra flights from today to February 2 have been received from 17 carriers. The most popular destinations are Taipei, Bangkok, Phuket and Shanghai. A record high of 725 flight movements is anticipated on Thursday (January 22), the Lunar New Year's Day. At present, the average number of daily aircraft movements at HKIA is 610.

"In view of the large number of air travellers during the period, it is of importance to remind them on the restrictions of the carriage of dangerous goods and restricted articles on board aircraft because these items pose a threat to aviation safety and security," said Mr Simon Li, Chief Safety Officer of CAD.

In 2003, an average of about 2,000 dangerous goods and restricted articles were detected from air passengers and their hand baggage every day at HKIA.

He said that the most commonly found dangerous goods inside baggage at HKIA were cigarette lighters, perfume or toiletry items, aerosols or compressed gases, fireworks, gas torches, and household items such as adhesives, polishes, bleach and drain cleaner. These items could be a danger when transported by air due to sudden temperature and pressure fluctuation and vibration. The law, therefore, restricts the type and quantity of dangerous goods allowed to be carried by air passengers on board an aircraft.

"It is an offence to take forbidden dangerous goods on board as they pose a risk to health, safety, property or the environment and have to be removed. As a matter of fact, many dangerous goods can be shipped as cargo if properly prepared, while some can be taken on board by passengers with restrictions applied," Mr Li added.

In respect of restricted articles, carriage of knife, knife-like object and bladed or pointed items are not allowed in the aircraft cabin and within the enhanced security restricted area of HKIA for enhancement of security. Passengers can put those items in their check-in baggage if needed. Nail clippers (excluding nail file) less than 6cm long, round-ended nail files, and round-ended scissors with blade less than 5cm long, however, are permitted.

Mr Li emphasised that if passengers observed the above restrictions on the carriage of dangerous goods and restricted articles, delay and inconvenience could be greatly minimised during check-in.

As a result of an ongoing passenger education programme conducted by CAD, the number of restricted articles and dangerous goods carried by passengers have been steadily declining in the past year.

More information on the safe carriage of dangerous goods and restricted articles can be obtained from the CAD website, address of which is http://www.cad.gov.hk(Open with new window).