1998

1997

- Search and Rescue Exercise 97, (3 December 1997)


Aircraft accident investigation report released

11 December 1998

The Government today (Friday) published the report of the investigation into a serious aircraft incident which was discovered during an inspection on 5 December 1996.

The incident involved a Cathay Pacific Airways Boeing 747-236F freighter. The torque bulkhead at the rear of the aircraft's No. One engine pylon was found to have suffered from a failure in the form of a crack that extended across the full width of the bulkhead.

"The investigation was conducted by the Accidents Investigation Division of the Civil Aviation Department (CAD) with the objective of identifying the cause in order to prevent future recurrence," a CAD spokesman said.

"The report contains an analysis of the circumstances surrounding the incident together with conclusions and recommendations."

"A recommendation calling on the manufacturer of the aircraft to take remedial measures was made in the report.

"We are pleased to learn that the aircraft manufacturer has adopted the recommendation," he said.

Copies of the report are now available for sale at the Government Publications Centre on the Ground Floor of Queensway Government Offices, Hong Kong.

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Civil Aviation Department launches search and rescue exercises

30 November 1998

The annual search and rescue exercise coordinated by the Civil Aviation Department (CAD) will be held for three consecutive days starting from Wednesday ( December 2 ).

The exercise is aimed to provide training and familiarization in search and rescue technique for staff of the CAD and other search and rescue units.

The exercise this year will consist of a static display of aircraft by the various participating units and rescue equipment by the Airport Fire Contingent, a short range rescue demonstration off near Sha Chau and a long range exercise in the South China Sea.

The short range rescue demonstration will include the launching and recovery of helicopters from a ship of the United States Coast Guard, and winching of simulated survivors by Government Flying Service and United States Coast Guard Cutter helicopters from the water and transfer of the simulated survivors onto the deck of the ship.

A spokesman for CAD said, "The main event would be the long range exercise to be held on Thursday (December 3). The long range exercise, being the first large-scale one since the inauguration of the New Airport at Chek Lap Kok, is to test the alerting and co-ordination procedures as well as communication facilities of various search and rescue units."

"It will be activated in the evening of December 2, simulating an aircraft in distress about 130 kilometers south of Hong Kong. Search aircraft, helicopters and ships will be dispatched to the area the following morning to search and locate the simulated targets in the South China Sea," he said.

In addition to CAD, other participants will include the United States Air Force, United States Coast Guard, United States Navy, People's Liberation Army's Hong Kong Garrison, Government Flying Service, Hong Kong Police Force (Marine Region), Marine Department, Fire Services Department, Civil Aid Services, Airport Authority and Information Services Department.

A number of search and rescue experts from the Asia-Pacific Region including the Mainland (Guangzhou, Shenzhen and Zhuhai), Macau, Thailand, Singapore and Brunei are also attending as observers.

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Speech delivered by Director of Civil Aviation, Mr. R A Siegel on the light-out ceremony of Kai Tak Airport.

5 July 1998

Kai Tak has served our community for over 60 years from being a grass field to becoming the 3rd busiest international airport in the world. It has made a vital contribution to our economy and has also been a gateway for the hopes and dreams of millions of passengers.

Its history has reflected the dynamic growth of our society and without the achievements of Kai Tak, Hong Kong today would be a very different place.

It will always be special in our hearts, not only here in Hong Kong but also to many people around the world.

Kai Tak has truly been one of the world's great airports but tonight we must say good bye to our old friend.

The last passenger has arrived, the last flight has departed, the runway is silent and it is now time to turn off the lights which have safely guided thousands of arriving aircraft.

Goodbye Kai Tak and thank you.

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Publication of Incident Report VR-HOX (2/97)

6 February 1998

The Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government today published the report of the investigation into an aircraft incident that happened shortly after take-off from Hong Kong on 28 May 1995. The incident involved a Cathay Pacific Airways Boeing 747-467 operating a scheduled flight CX289 from Hong Kong to Frankfurt.

The investigation was conducted by the Civil Aviation Department. The objective of the investigation is to identify the cause of the incident and prevent future recurrence.

The report contains an analysis of the circumstances surrounding the incident together with conclusions and recommendations. The aircraft*s Number 2 engine experienced an engine fire and was substantially damaged. Twenty-two persons suffered from minor injury, mainly abrasions and lacerations during passenger evacuation after landing.

Five safety recommendations were made in the report and they were addressed to the operator of the aircraft (Cathay Pacific Airways Limited), the Hong Kong Civil Aviation Department, Airport Fire Services, UK Civil Aviation Authority and Rolls-Royce plc to take remedial measures.

Copies of the report are for sale at the Government Publication Sales Centre on the Ground Floor of Queensway Government Offices, Hong Kong. Copy will be boxed at ISD.

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Civil Aviation Department Long Range Aeronautical Search and Rescue Exercise

3 December 1997

The annual Search and Rescue Exercise organized by Civil Aviation Department of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government will be held for three days starting today Wednesday 3 December 1997. The exercise is to provide training and familiarization in search and rescue techniques for staff of the Civil Aviation Department and other rescue units.

The exercise this year will consist of a static display of Search and Rescue aircraft consisting of a C130 of the United States Coast Guard, a P3 of the United States Navy, a C9 of the United States Air Force and a Super King Air and Sikorsky helicopters of the Government Flying Service and a Search and Rescue Symposium by various participating units and a Long Range Exercise in the South China Sea.

In addition to CAD, other participants included are the United States Air Force, United States Coast Guard, United States Navy, Government Flying Service, Hong Kong Police Force, Marine Department, Civil Aid Services and Information Services Department.

A number of Search and Rescue experts from the Asia-Pacific Region including Guangzhou, Shenzhen, Zhuhai, Macau and Vietnam have also participated as observers.